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Guidelines for the Food Safety Control of Imported Foodstuffs Entering South Africa Through Land Ports of Entry

Department of Health

Directorate: Food Control

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Scope and purpose of the guidelines
  3. Provisions and application of the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act 54 of 1972)
  4. Codex Alimentarius Commission, SPS/TBT measures and related matters
  5. Inter-sectoral arrangements and operational procedure for the control of foodstuffs at land ports of entry
  6. Conclusion

References

Annexures

Southern African Development Community

List of land ports of entry through which foodstuffs can be imported into South Africa from neighbouring countries per province designated by the South African Revenue Services (SARS)

List of regulations applicable to foodstuffs imported into South Africa

Contact details of the environmental health components of the nine provincial health departments responsible for food safety control at land ports of entry

Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act 1972, (Act 54 of 1972): inspectors and powers, duties, and functions of inspectors

Contact details of the members of the NIDS: border control OPCO’S AND IMCO’S for the designated land ports of entry

Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act 54 of 1972):  Weekly Return of Consignments Entering the RSA through Land Ports of Entry

  1. Introduction

Food safety is an increasingly important public health issue and according to the WHO, governments all over the world are intensifying their efforts to improve food safety. The globalisation of trade in food is one of the challenges, which needs to be addressed to ensure food safety and the protection of a country’s consumers against foodborne diseases. As a result of the ever-increasing global trade, many outbreaks of foodborne diseases and other illnesses that were once contained within a small community may now take on global dimensions. Examples of this are the recent problems experienced by the United Kingdom as a result of the incidence related to mad cow disease, and that of Belgium regarding the dioxin contamination of products, which were exported to many countries, including South Africa.

However, the present-day international trade in food is playing an increasingly important role in the provision of safe and nutritious diets for the world’s populations. As for South Africa, it provides, amongst others, for its neighbours and other SADC and African trading partners opportunities to earn much-needed foreign exchange through food exports. This is indispensable for the economic development of many countries, especially developing countries, including African countries, where agriculture is in many cases the main sector of the economy, thus improving the standard of living for many people on the continent.

  1. Scope and Purpose of the Guidelines

As a result of various developments regarding the harmonization of trade, both globally and regionally within SADC and the rest of Africa, a significant increase in foodstuffs being imported into this country has already been experienced and is expected to continue in the future. This is especially true for the fourteen SADC member states as a result of the Free Trade Agreement signed by all the members, excluding the DRC, Seychelles and Angola. The Agreement was implemented from September 2000 and a list of all the SADC member states is included as Annexure A.

In view of the above-mentioned, the Department of Health, Directorate: Food Control has identified a need for the development of these guidelines. The drafting of this document is therefore one of the steps in a process, which will attempt to ensure the participation of and inputs from all the role players involved in this matter.

During the finalisation of the guidelines, however, the envisaged changes related to the rendering of services, (including Port Health Services) at district level within the provinces, as well as that which may result from the proposed transformation of the food control system for the country, should be kept in mind.

The purpose of the guidelines is, firstly, to create uniformity regarding the control and procedures to be implemented to ensure that the various health authorities within the national health system fulfil their obligations with regard to the food safety control of consignments of foodstuffs entering the country through land ports of entry. With the exception of the Gauteng and Western Cape Provinces, all the remaining provinces share a direct border with one or more of the country’s neighbours.

The opportunity therefore, exists for foodstuffs to enter through any of the land ports of entry designated by SARS (Customs Division) of the Department of Finance to deal with commercial goods. A list of the designated land ports of entry per province is included as Annexure B.

Secondly, the guidelines are aimed at establishing, where possible, co-operation between the role players within the health sector and other authorities involved in border control. The role played by the National Inter-Departmental Structure (NIDS) for Border Control functioning at the various levels of control within South Africa, provides an ideal opportunity for the various health authorities, (national, provincial and district levels), to co-operate with the following Departments, which are represented by full-time personnel at all the designated land ports of entry:

bulletDepartment of Finance: SARS (Division: Customs)
bulletDepartment of Home Affairs (Division: Immigration)
bulletSouth African Police Services (Branch: Border Control)
bulletNational Department of Agriculture (Directorates: Veterinary Services and/or Plant Health)

Although the National Department of Agriculture at present does not have full-time personnel at all the designated land ports of entry, the Department is in the process of appointing more personnel, as well as where possible, arrange for the available officers to render services at more than one post.

  1. Provisions and Applications of the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act 54/1972)

The Act is the most important set of health legislation aimed at inter alia, addressing the safety of all foodstuffs manufactured, sold or imported into the country. Apart from the legislative authority of the Minister of Health to promulgate regulations on those matters specified in the Act, it empowers the Director-General of the Department to execute the following actions in respect of imported foodstuffs:

bulletAuthorise persons as inspectors
bulletAuthorise persons as analysts
bulletConcur with Customs and Excise to remove imported foodstuffs to a place approved in terms of this subsection and makes an order in respect thereof
bulletDecide that payment to be made by an importer of foodstuffs is acceptable and to accept a guarantee by means of the completion and signing by the importer of form GW 22/6
bulletOrder by means of the completion of form GW 22/3 that imported foodstuffs be:
  1. confiscated and destroyed
  2. returned to port of shipment or place of origin
  3. may be imported on certain conditions
  4. shall be dealt with in a specific manner

An example of the Guarantee form (GW 22/6) and the Order form (GW 22/3) are included as Annexure C.

All imported foodstuffs must meet the compositional, labelling and other requirements as specified by the comprehensive set of regulations promulgated by the Minister in terms of the Act and of which a detailed list of the regulations presently enacted is included in Annexure D. At present, no prior certification of imported foodstuffs is required in terms of the mentioned Act and it is the responsibility of the importer to ensure that the products imported meet the provisions of both the Act and the regulations before it enters the country.

The responsibilities of the national Department of Health as determined by the Act and indicated above, is handled by the Directorate: Food Control, of which the contact details are as follows:

Department of Health
Directorate: Food Control
Private Bag X828
Pretoria 0001
South Africa
Tel no: +27-12-312 0185
Fax no: +27-12-326 4374
E-mail: ventert@health.gov.za
Website: www.health.gov.za

The rendering of Port Health Services as a component of a comprehensive Environmental Health Service, including the health related inspection and monitoring of the safety of imported foodstuffs in terms of the Act, are the function of the nine provincial authorities. Presently the control of imported foodstuffs, although remaining the statutory responsibility of the national Department of Health as indicated, is handled on behalf of the Department by the relevant personnel of the provinces.

Included, as Annexure E, is an address list of the head offices of the nine provinces, including contact details of the Environmental Health components.

The Act makes provision for persons employed as Customs and Excise Control officers by SARS and as law enforcement officers by the SAPS to act as inspectors in terms of the Act (Section 10), and to carry out the powers, duties and functions of an inspector as stipulated under Section 11. This is also with respect to the control of imported foodstuffs as described above. In view of the fact that officers of both the mentioned Departments are already stationed at the designated land ports of entry, the opportunity should be utilised by the health sector to consider co-operating with their colleagues from these departments regarding the control of imported foodstuffs. An extract of Sections 10 and 11 of the Act is included as Annexure F for reference purposes.

  1. Codex Alimentarius Commission, SPS/TBT Measures and Related Matters

The Joint FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex in short), was established in 1962 to protect the health of consumers and at the same time to ensure fair practices in food trade by promoting the harmonisation of food standards applied by the various members of Codex.

The WTO Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (in short the SPS Agreement), was drawn up to ensure that countries apply measures to protect human and animal health (sanitary measures) and plant health (phytosanitary measures) based on science. The SPS Agreement therefore, incorporates safety aspects of foods in trade. Another WTO Agreement, the Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (in short the TBT Agreement) covers all technical requirements and standards applied to all commodities, such as labelling of foodstuffs that are not covered by the SPS Agreement.

For food safety, the SPS Agreement recognises, as the international reference, the standards, guidelines and recommendations established by Codex. As long as a country employs these standards, its measures are presumed to be consistent with the SPS Agreement.

The SADC Trade Negotiation Forum (TNF) is the Forum responsible for the negotiations on a Southern Africa Free Trade Agreement (SAFTA) in terms of the SADC ‘Protocol on Trade’ implemented from September 2000. The TNF, in accordance with Article 16 and 17 of the Protocol in question recommended the establishment of a permanent SADC Coordinating Committee on SPS/TBT Measures for Agricultural Products and related Commodities (CC-SPS/TBT), as a support mechanism to the implementation of the Protocol. The aim of the CC-SPS/TBT is to provide guidance, advice, assistance and leadership in the development of SPS/TBT measures to promote trade. Such measures should be in harmony with existing international standards, guidelines and recommendations to, amongst others, facilitate the free flow of agricultural goods, such as foods, between SADC member states, while protecting human, animal and plant health and the environment of individual States.

The national Department of Health, Directorate: Food Control, through the National SPS Committee of the National Department of Agriculture participates at present in the above-mentioned SADC initiatives and has contributed to the development of the Terms of Reference for the CC-SPS/TBT accepted by the Ministerial Council of SADC.

Provincial/district health authorities exercising food safety control at land ports of entry in terms of Act 54 of 1972, as described earlier, needs to take cognisance of the mentioned developments regarding SPS/TBT measures within SADC. Foodstuffs entering the country should comply in all respects to the requirements of the Act which, in turn, should as far as possible be based on the standards, guidelines and recommendations of Codex.

To prevent the mentioned health authorities from taking decisions which may not be in line with Codex, or which may lead to a dispute between South Africa and the exporting country, health authorities should, if uncertain regarding the requirements applicable to a specific consignment of foodstuffs, contact the Directorate: Food Control for advice and/or assistance.

  1. Inter-Sectoral Arrangements and Operational Procedure for the Control of Foodstuffs at Land Ports of Entry

The organisation of NIDS: Border Control consists of various structures at a national level where, amongst others, all the Departments mentioned earlier, including the national Department of Health, Directorate: Environmental Health, are represented. A Task Team for Accommodation at Land Ports of Entry, on which the Department of Health is also represented, is part of the national structure. For each of the land ports, an OPCO and IMCO structure has been created on which a representative of the mentioned Departments are serving. Included as Annexure G are details of all the OPCO’s and IMCO’s members, as well as their contact details.

At present none of the provinces have full-time personnel stationed at any of the land ports of entry listed in Annexure B to attend to food safety control as required by Act 54 of 1972 regarding consignments of foodstuffs entering the country from neighbouring states. The Restrictive List document of SARS clearly indicates what food products controlled by the Act should be detained for Port Health clearance before released to the importer/owner. Due to the absence of health personnel, or the lack of an arrangement to be notified whenever such products enter the country, no food safety control takes place at present at any of the land ports of entry. The following factors contribute to the situation as described:

bulletLack of resources (human resources and funds) available on the budgets for Environmental Health of the seven provinces in whose areas the designated inland border posts (see Annexure B) are situated to appoint/allocate full-time personnel for food safety control at these land ports.
bulletWith the exception of two or three of the designated land ports, the number of consignments of foodstuffs entering the country through the remaining border posts at present does not justify full-time health personnel to be available or stationed at those ports.
bulletLack of participation of the district health personnel responsible for food safety control of imported foodstuffs in the structures of NIDS: Border Control existing and operating at each of the land ports of entry.
bulletLack of liaison/consultation by the district health personnel with the officers of other departments, such as Agriculture, Customs, SAPS, stationed at land ports on possible assistance they can provide related to food safety control.

The inspection and/or investigation of consignments of foodstuffs for food safety control purposes do not necessarily need to be carried out at the time such a consignment arrives at any of the border posts. Act 54 of 1972 (Section 14) provides for a procedure whereby the health personnel responsible for the food safety control of the consignment can grant an ‘extended health detention’ to the importer and/or owner.

In view of the aforementioned, taking into account the factors as listed above, it is clear that a need exists for the health authorities at the national, provincial and district levels responsible for the provisions of Act 54 of 1972, to develop and implement measures which will ensure that this matter is more effectively attended to. Such measures will under the circumstances depend on inter-sectoral co-operation between the various departments and a procedure needs to be discussed and agreed upon between the district health personnel and the full-time personnel of the other departments stationed at the various land ports. This should be initiated by the mentioned health personnel, by ensuring their participation in the structures of NIDS at all the designated land ports.

For the purpose of granting extended health detention for consignments of foodstuffs the Directorate: Food Control has developed a notification form specifically to be utilised for food safety control at land ports of entry. An example of the notification form is included as Annexure H and the purpose thereof will be described in more detail under the operational procedure, which follows.

To assist the health personnel in question and to ensure uniformity countrywide regarding the mentioned inter-sectoral arrangements, an operational procedure consisting of the following steps and process is proposed:

bulletDistrict health personnel make contact with the NIDS IMCO’s of the designated land ports situated within their areas of responsibility and request to participate as a member to make inputs on Port Health in general and on food safety control specifically.
bulletDistrict health personnel request through the IMCO’s, or on an officer-to-officer basis assistance from other departments stationed at the relevant land ports with regard to the notification of all consignments of foodstuffs entering the country. This is done by the completion of the notification form included as Annexure F and faxing it on a need-to basis, but at least weekly, to the office of the Directorate: Food Control as indicated on the form.
bulletAs most of the consignments in question are expected to be on route to destinations outside the province where it has entered the country, therefore to be offloaded at a premises situated within another province, the Directorate: Food Control will be responsible for notifying the latter by faxing the notification to the head office of that province, for attention.
bulletThe provincial head office will be responsible for notifying the district health office in whose area of jurisdiction the consignment will be offloaded, who will be responsible for carrying out the inspection/investigation of the consignment in question.
bulletWhen necessary, the district health office will inform the provincial head office of any problems experienced during the release of the consignment. The head office will inform the Directorate: Food Control, who will in turn bring the matter to the attention of the relevant district personnel where the consignment entered the country. Otherwise, if necessary, the Directorate will inform all provinces to take note of the matter and/or revise the procedure to prevent any future occurrence thereof.
bulletTaking into account the arrangements regarding the SPS/TBT measures within SADC as described earlier; in the event of a district’s health personnel rejecting a consignment of foodstuffs imported from any of the SADC member States, keeping in mind that an order should be issued (GW 22/3), which must be signed by the Director: Food Control, the mentioned Directorate must further be fully informed of the circumstances related to such actions.

The main role of the Directorate: Food Control as described in the above procedure, is to act as a link between the various provinces through which foodstuffs enter the country and those to which it is it destined, as well as to co-ordinate any aspect which may impact on the arrangements within SADC in this regard.

  1. Conclusion

These guidelines are the first attempt to formally address the issue in question and the success of the application of its contents clearly depends on the will of and good co-operation between the district health personnel and that of the other departments who have full-time personnel stationed at the designated land ports of entry.

To fulfil its statutory obligations regarding the food safety control of imported foodstuffs, as well as to ensure that proper measures are implemented to enhance free trade within SADC, but at the same time to also fulfil its obligation to protect the health of consumers as provided for by the relevant SPS/TBT measures, it is hoped that these guidelines will provide the necessary support to all the role players within the national health system.

References

Food Safety and Globalisation of Trade in Food, a Challenge to the Public Health Sector. WHO Publication, 1997.
Trade and Public Health. WHO Backgrounder, 1999.
Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act 54 of 1972). Lex Patria Publishers, South Africa, 1999.

ANNEXURE A

Southern African Development Community

SADC Profile

Originally known as the Southern African Development Coordination Conference (SADCC), the Organisation was formed in Lusaka, Zambia, on April 1, 1980, following the adoption of the Lusaka Declaration – Southern Africa: Towards Economic Liberation by the nine founding members. The Declaration and Treaty establishing the Southern African Development Community (SADC), which has replaced the Coordination Conference, was signed on August 17, 1992 in Windhoek, Namibia.

Member States are:

bulletAngola
bulletBotswana
bulletDemocratic Republic of Congo
bulletLesotho
bulletMalawi
bulletMauritius
bulletMozambique
bulletNamibia
bulletSeychelles
bulletSouth Africa
bulletTanzania
bulletSwaziland
bulletZambia
bulletZimbabwe

ANNEXURE B

List of Land Ports of Entry through which Foodstuffs can be Imported into South Africa from Neighbouring Countries per Province Designated by the South African Revenue Services (SARS)

PROVINCE

NAME OF BORDER POST

NEIGHBOURING COUNTRY

Northern Province Groblersbrug Botswana
  Beit Bridge Zimbabwe
     
North West Province Ramatlabama Botswana
  Kopfonteinhek Botswana
  Skilpadshek Botswana
     
Mpumalanga Jeppes Reef Swaziland
  Nerston Swaziland
  Oshoek Swaziland
  Mahamba Swaziland
  Mananga Swaziland
  Lebombo Mozambique
     
Free State Caledonspoort Lesotho
  Fickburg Bridge Lesotho
  Maseru Bridge Lesotho
  Van Rooyenshek Lesotho
Eastern Cape Quachasnek Lesotho
     
Northern Cape Nakop Namibia
  Vioolsdrift Namibia
     
KwaZulu-Natal Golela Swaziland

ANNEXURE C

(GW 22/6)

(GW 22/3)

ANNEXURE D

Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act 54 of 1972): List of Regulations Applicable to Foodstuffs Imported into South Africa

bulletRegulations: Jam, conserve, marmalade and jelly (R. 2627/12 December 1986)
bulletRegulations: Governing emulsifiers, stabilisers and thickeners and the amounts thereof that foodstuffs may contain (R. 2527/13 November 1987)
bulletRegulations: Governing tolerances for fungus-produced toxins in foodstuffs (R. 313/16 February 1990
bulletRegulations: Relating to perishable foodstuffs (R. 952/6 August 1999)
bulletRegulations: Governing radio activity in foodstuffs (R. 1931/17 August 1990)
bulletRegulations relating to baking powder and chemical leavening substances (R. 2486/26 October 1990)
bulletRegulations: Governing the composition and labelling of raw boerewors, raw species sausage and raw mixed species sausage (R. 2718/23 November 1990)
bulletRegulations: Prohibiting guargum as a foodstuff (R. 2554 - 25 October 1991)
bulletRegulations: Relating to the use of sweeteners in foodstuffs (R. 3128/20 December 1991)
bulletRegulations: Governing the maximum limits for veterinary medicine and stock remedy residues that may be present in foodstuffs (R. 1809/3 July 1992)
bulletRegulations: Relating to herbs and spices (R. 1468/13 August 1993)
bulletRegulations: Governing the labelling and advertising of foodstuffs (R. 2034/29 October 1993)
bulletRegulations: Governing the maximum limits for pesticide residues that may be present in foodstuffs (R. 246/11 February 1994)
bulletRegulations: Relating to metals in foodstuffs (R. 1518/9 September 1994)
bulletRegulations: Relating to salt (R. 996/7 July 1995)
bulletRegulations: Enforcement by local authorities (R. 382/8 March 1996)
bulletRegulations: Relating to food colourants (R. 1008/21 June 1996)
bulletRegulations: Relating to edible fats and oils (R. 1316/16 August 1996)
bulletRegulations: Governing microbiological standards for foodstuffs and related matters (R. 692/16 May 1997)
bulletRegulations: Anti-caking agents – amounts that may be used in foodstuffs (R. 2507/1982)
bulletRegulations: Preservatives and antioxidants (R. 965/1977)
bulletRegulations: Irradiated foodstuffs (R. 1600/1983)
bulletRegulations: Duties of inspectors and analysts (R. 2162/1973)
bulletRegulations: Soft drinks (R. 1769/1985)
bulletRegulations: Mayonnaise and other salad dressings (R. 92/1986)
bulletRegulations: Milk and dairy products (R. 1555/1997)
bulletRegulations: Enrichment of maize meal (R. 2839/1979)
bulletRegulations: Mineral hydrocarbons in foodstuffs (R. 230/1977)
bulletRegulations: Sea food (R. 2064/1973)
bulletRegulations: Tolerances for certain seeds in certain agricultural products (R. 1466/1987)
bulletRegulations: Use of certain food additives in certain wheaten and rye products (R. 2417/1987)
bulletRegulations: Substances in wine, other fermented beverages and spirits – additives, amounts and tolerances (R. 2870/1981)
bulletRegulations: Acids, bases and salts – the amounts thereof that foodstuffs may contain (R. 115/1986)
bulletRegulations: Restrictions on the sale of food additives containing nitrite and/or nitrate and other substances (R. 219/1975)
bulletRegulations: Manufactured or processed meat products (R. 2037/1975)
bulletRegulations: Foodstuffs for infancts, young children and children (R. 1130/1984)
bulletRegulations under the Food, Drugs and Disinfectants Act No. 13 of 1929 (No. 575 - 28 March 1930)

ANNEXURE E

Contact Details of the Environment Health Components of the nine Provincial Health Departments Responsible for Food Safety Control at Land Ports of Entry

PROVINCE

POSTAL ADDRESS

CONTACT DETAILS

NORTHERN Superintendent-General
Dept of Health and Welfare
Private Bag X9302
Pietersburg 0700
Tel: 015-2952851x2291
Fax: 015-2915146
NORTH WEST Permanent Secretary
Dept of Health and Developmental Social Welfare
Private Bag X2068
Mmabatho 8681
Tel: 018-3875096
Fax: 018-3875332
GAUTENG Permanent Secretary
Dept of Health
PO Box 62302
Marshalltown 2107
Tel: 011-3553885
Fax: 011-3553381
MPUMALANGA Deputy Director-General
Dept of Health and Welfare
Private Bag X11285
Nelspruit 1200
Tel: 013-7528085x2043
Fax: 013-7553549
KWAZULU-NATAL Superintendent-General
Dept of Health
Private Bag X9051
Pietermaritzburg 3200
Tel: 0331-952772
Fax: 0331- 421405
WESTERN CAPE Superintendent-General
Department of Health
PO Box 2060
Cape Town 8000
Tel: 021-4834652
Fax: 021-4834345
NORTHERN CAPE Deputy Director- General
Dept of Health and Welfare
Private Bag X5049
Kimberley 8300
Tel: 053-8300654
Fax: 053-8300655
EASTERN CAPE Permanent Secretary
Dept of Health and Welfare
Private Bag X0038
Bisho 5608
Tel: 040-6364543
Fax: 040-6350072
FREE STATE Deputy Director-General
Dept of Health
PO Box 517
Bloemfontein 9300
Tel: 051-4301933
Fax: 051-4483077

ANNEXURE F

Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act 54 of 1972): Inspectors and Powers, Duties, and Functions of Inspectors (Sections 10 and 11)

Inspectors.

{}10.(1) The Director-General may authorise such persons as he may deem fit, as inspectors who shall, subject to his control, be vested with the powers, duties and functions conferred or imposed on inspectors by this Act.

{}10.(2) Each person authorised under subsection 10.(1) shall be provided with a letter of authority signed by or on behalf of the Director-General and certifying that such person has been authorised as an inspector in terms of this Act.

{}10.(3) The powers, duties and functions of an inspector in terms of this Act may be exercised or performed -

{}10.(3)(a) in respect of any foodstuff, cosmetic or disinfectant referred to in section 14.(3), by an officer of the Office of the Commissioner for Customs and Excise authorised there into in writing, either in general or in a particular case, by the Commissioner for Customs and Excise;

{}10.(3)(b) for the purposes of the administration of any provision of this Act by a local authority under section 23., by any person employed by such local authority as a health inspector and authorised thereto in writing by such local authority;

{}10.(3)(c) by any member of the South African Police of or above the rank of sergeant;

{}10.(3)(d) by any member of the South African Police below the rank of sergeant authorised thereto in writing by a member referred to in paragraph 10.(3)(c).

{}10.(3)(e) in respect of any foodstuff, by any person appointed under section 18. of the Standards Act. 1962 (Act No. 33 of 1962), as an inspector for the purposes of that Act.

POWERS, DUTIES AND FUNCTIONS OF INSPECTORS.

{}11.(1) An inspector may at all reasonable times enter upon any premise on or in which any foodstuff, cosmetic or disinfectant is or is suspected to be manufactured, treated, graded, packed, marked, labelled, kept, stored, conveyed, sold, served or administered or on or in which any other operation or activity with or in connection with any foodstuff, cosmetic or disinfectant is or is suspected to be carried out, and may, subject to the provisions of this Act -

{}11.(1)(a) inspect or search such premises, or examine, or extract, take and remove samples of, any foodstuff, cosmetic or disinfectant, found in or upon such premises, or any appliance, product, material, object or substance so found which is or is suspected to be used, or to be destined or intended for use, for, in or in connection with the manufacture, treatment, grading, packing, marking, labelling. storage, conveyance, serving or administering of any foodstuff, cosmetic or disinfectant, or for, in or in connection with any other operation or activity with or in connection with any foodstuff, cosmetic. disinfectant, or open any package or container of such foodstuff, cosmetic, disinfectant, product, material, object or substance;

{}11.(1)(b) demand any information regarding any such foodstuff, cosmetic, disinfectant, appliance, product, material, object or substance from any person in whose possession or charge it is or from the owner or person in charge of such premises;

{}11.(1)(c) weigh, count, measure, mark or seal any such foodstuff, cosmetic, disinfectant, appliance, product, material, object, or substance or its package or container, or lock, secure, seal or close any door or opening giving access to it;

{}11.(1)(d) examine or make copies of, or take extracts from, any book, statement or other document found in or upon such premises and which refers or is suspected to refer to such foodstuff, cosmetics, disinfectant, appliance, product material, object or substance;

{}11.(1)(e) demand from the owner or any person in charge of such premises or from any person in whose possession or charge such book, statement or other document is, an explanation of any entry in it;

{}11.(1)(f) inspect any operation or process carried out in or upon such premises in connection with any activity referred to in paragraph 11.(1)(a);

{}11.(1)(g) demand any information regarding such operation or process from the owner or person in charge of such premises or from any person carrying out or in charge of the carrying out of such operation or process;

{}11.(1)(h) seize any foodstuff, cosmetic, disinfectant, appliance, product, material, object, substance, book, statement or document which appears to provide proof of a contravention of any provision of this Act.

{}11.(2) An inspector referred to in section 10.(1) or 10.(3)(a), 10.(3)(b), and 10.(3)(d) shall exhibit the written authority by virtue of which he is authorised as an inspector to any person affected by the exercise or performance of any power, duty or function of such inspector under this Act.

{}11.(3) The procedure to be followed by an inspector in obtaining, transmitting for analysis or examination or otherwise dealing with any sample, shall be prescribed by regulation.

ANNEXURE G

Contact of the Members of the NIDS: Border Control OPCO’S and IMCO’S for Designated Land Ports of a Entry

OPCO - Beitbridge -Northern Province

Name

Department

Fax

Tel

Lenéz James Secretary (015) – 530 0072 (015) - 530 0070
Sr Sup J J P Uys SAPS (015) – 530 0072 082 8095562
R Hartman DHA (015) - 530 0070 (015) - 530 0067
K Smit SARS (015) - 530 0072 (015) - 5300071
I Philandwa SARS (015) - 530 0072 082 4593780

OPCO - Groblersbrug - Northern Province

Mev Oosthuizen Secretary (014) - 767 1051 (014) - 7671164
F E Oosthuizen SAPS (014) - 767 1051 (014) - 7671164
J A van Zyl DHA (014) - 767 1264 (014) - 767 1019
G Lebepe SARS (014) - 767 1264 083 3283628

OPCO - Jeppes Reef - Mpumalanga

Mr Grobler DHA (013) - 781 0383 (013) - 781 0382
F du Plooy SARS (013) - 781 0562 (013) - 781 0561
Insp V A Nyambi SAPS (013) - 781 0384 (013) - 781 0384

OPCO - Lebombo - Mpumalanga

Capt L Piater SAPS (013) - 790 8190 (013) - 790 7311
Mr L Human SARS (013) - 790 7059 (013) - 790 7201
Mr J Schreiber DHA (013) - 790 7091 (013) - 790 7203
Mr R S Zitha DHA (013) - 753 3501 (013) - 753 3100

OPCO - Mahamba - Mpumalanga

Mrs B Stander SARS (017) - 826 4622 (017) - 826 4629
Mr Heenen DHA (017) - 825 0077 (017) - 825 0076
Capt Meiring SAPS (017) - 825 1019 (017) - 825 1019

OPCO - Mananga - Mpumalanga

Mr H J C v Rensburg DHA (013) - 790 7076 (013) - 790 7075
Mr J Smit SARS (013) - 790 7059 (013) - 790 7203
Sgt Thobela SAPS (013) - 790 7594 (013) - 790 7167

OPCO - Nerston - Mpumalanga

Mr P J Human DHA (017) - 846 9602 (017) - 846 9207
D Witbooi SARS (017) - 846 9602 (017) - 846 9429 / 9284
Insp A K Mhaule SAPS (017) - 846 9311 (017) - 846 9311

OPCO - Oshoek - Mpumalanga

Capt J Scholtz SAPS (017) - 882 0002 082 4984541
J van Deventer SARS (017) - 882 0060 (017) - 882 0061
T Monareng DHA (017) - 882 0140 (017) - 882 0139

OPCO - Golela - K Z N

Johan Steyn SARS (034) - 435 1166 (034) - 435 1165
Capt A C vd Westhuizen SAPS (034) - 435 1016 (034) - 435 1025
P W J van Wyk DHA (034) - 435 1048 (034) - 435 1070

OPCO - Quachasnek - Eastern Cape

Capt Erasmus SAPS No fax  
Chantelle Kindness Secretary   082 4433261

OPCO - Caledonspoort - Free State

Capt van Wyngaardt SAPS (058) - 223 0201 (058) - 223 0201
Mr D A Marais DHA   (058) - 223 0266
S de Swardt SARS (058) - 223 1108 (058) - 223 1106
 

OPCO - Ficksburg Bridge - Free State

Mr Jaftas DHA (051) - 9334540 (051) - 933 3561
Mr M K Landzela SARS (051) - 933 5839 / 5833 (051) - 933 5674
Capt van Zyl SAPS (051) - 933 5858 (051) - 933 5536

OPCO - Maseru Bridge - Free State

Capt Gresse SAPS 051 - 9244003 051 - 924 4003
Mr J Fritz SARS 051 - 924 4036 051 - 924 4030/36
Mr Erasmus DHA   05192 44004
Annetjie Strombeck   (051) - 9244000  

OPCO - Van Rooyenshek - Free State

Insp Gericke SAPS (051) - 583 1530 (051) - 583 1516
Mr N S Mahao DHA (051) - 583 1530 (051) - 583 1525
T P Paul SARS (051) - 5831475 (051) - 583 1613 / 9

OPCO - Nakop - Northern Cape

Mr T Drotsky SARS (054) - 571 0004 (054) - 571 0005/6/7
Capt P Mnuguni SAPS (054) - 571 0003 (054) - 571 0002

OPCO - Vioolsdrift - Northern Cape

Mr K S Semono DHA (027) - 761 8931 (027) - 761 8960
Martin Huisamen SARS (027) - 761 8977 (027) - 761 8707
Capt B v d Heever SAPS (027) - 761 8750 (027) - 761 8738

OPCO - Kopfonteinhek - Northwest Province

Mr M W Baitsi DHA (018) - 365 9057 (018) - 365 9055
Capt Mothibi SAPS (018) - 365 9108  
Steven Petla SARS (018) - 365 9026 (018) - 365 9057/

9016

 

OPCO - Ramatlabama - Northwest Province

Margaret Motwe SARS (018) -393 0314 (018) - 393 0313 /

386 2477

Capt Rantsa SAPS (0140) - 862 918 (0140) - 863 103

OPCO - Skilpadshek - Northwest Province

Ismael Mogatle SARS (018) - 364 1469 (018) - 364 1469
Capt Molefe SAPS (0140) - 660 012 (0140) - 660 011

IMCO - Mpumalanga (Lebombo – Oshoek – Jeppes Reef – Mahamba

Mananga)

Supt. Thys Ludolff Acting chairman (013) - 249 1188  
Snr Supt VHJ v Rensburg SAPS (013) - 249 1188 (013) - 249 1021
Mr M Viljoen SARS (015) - 291 4678 (015) - 291 4670
Mr R S Zitha DHA (013) - 753 3501 (013) - 753 3100

IMCO - Northern Province (Beit Bridge – Groblersbrug)

Snr Supt R du Toit SAPS (015) - 290 6790 (015) - 290 6797
Mr V Mabunda – Chairman DHA (015) - 291 4455 (015) - 295 5220
Swannie Roux NDPW (015) - 291 3048 (015) - 295 6472
Mr M Viljoen SARS (015) - 291 4678 (015) - 291 4670
Mrs S du Toit (will distr) Secretariat (015) - 291 4455 (015) - 295 5220

IMCO – Eastern Cape (Quachasnek)

Dir G L J Schooling SAPS (041) - 394 6352 (041) - 394 6176
Mr A A J Brits SARS (031) - 332 2823 (031) - 367 6000
Mr L S Myataza DHA (043) - 643 3003 (043) - 643 4689

IMCO - Northwest Province (Kopfontein - Ramatlabama – Skilpadshek)

Supt J W J Harmse SAPS (018) - 642 2851 (018) - 642 2011
Mr W Botha SARS (016) - 933 2195 (016) - 933 2177
Mr M M A Macala DHA (018) - 384 5449 (018) - 384 5443

IMCO - Northern Cape (Vioolsdrift – Nakop )

Sr Supt J J Z Gerber SAPS (054) - 3312198 (054) - 3312195
Harry Malila SARS (054) - 332 3501 (054) - 331 1210
Mr Y Simons DHA (053) - 832 6283 (053) - 832 1143
Mr A J P van Rooi DHA (054) - 332 4832 (054) - 332 3117

IMCO - Free State (Maseru Bridge – Caledonspoort – Ficksburg Bridge Van Rooyenshek)

Sr Supt S J Wentzel SAPS (051) - 430 6264 /

447 6155

(051) - 430 1150
Mr W Botha SARS (016) - 933 2195 (016) - 933 2177
Mr R Ndema DHA (051) - 430 5859 (051) - 430 1130

IMCO - K Z N (Golela)

Dir W A Venter SAPS (031) - 360 4795 (031) - 360 473272
Mr A A J Brits SARS (031) - 332 2823 (031) - 367 6000
Mr W E Delport DHA (031) - 309 7995 (031) - 309 7990

ANNEXURE H

Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act 54 of 1972):  Weekly Return of Consignments Entering the RSA through LAnd Ports of Entry

Name of Border Post Period: From _________________ To____________________________

Please fax weekly to:   Complete by:  
  Department of Health
Directorate: Food Control
Pretoria
Fax: (012) 326-4374
  Name:
Department:
Phone number:
Fax number:
 

Date of entry

Product

B/E No.

Volume

Destination Address of Consignment

Importer telephone no. and address

Province

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             

 

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